Nursing: Emerging Infectious Diseases

33.95
Online
Elective
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About the Course

Nurses in every practice setting must be aware of the effects of emerging infectious diseases (EID). Case in point: the COVID-19 pandemic, which has influenced nearly every facet of life. As a result, nurses, at the center of the healthcare system, must understand the scientific as well as sociological aspects of infectious disease (ID). This course provides an overview of EID, offering useful historic and scientific underpinnings, as well as an introduction to the less obvious consequences of rapidly spreading infections. The course is aimed at empowering nurses to best serve their patients, despite the challenges projected by EID-associated disruptions. In broad strokes, this course provides general ID and EID information, discusses consequences of a pandemic, provides an overview of how governments and organizations prepare for EID, methods to combat the spread of ID, and descriptions of specific nursing approaches useful to prevent and manage EID.

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Provide two historic examples of a global pandemic.
  • Describe a potential consequence of antimicrobial resistance.
  • Explain how R0 can change over the course of an epidemic.
  • Detail a scenario that could permit an outbreak of a previously eradicated ID in the United States.
  • Identify one reason why some people refuse to vaccinate themselves and/or their children.
  • Understand the relationship between a pandemic and the human need to assign blame.
  • Name three components of hygiene efforts useful to counter the spread of ID.
  • Acknowledge the role of public health agencies in the management of contagious ID.
  • Identify two elements needed to support effective contact tracing efforts.
  • Explain two practices that nurses can teach their patients that are effective in reducing the spread of contagious diseases.

About the Author:
Bradley Gillespie, PharmD

Trained as a clinical pharmacist, Dr. Gillespie has practiced in an industrial setting for the past 25+ years. His initial role was as a Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceutics reviewer at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), followed by 20 years of leading early development programs in the pharma/biotech/nutritional industries. In addition to his industrial focus, he remains a registered pharmacist and enjoys mentoring drug development scientists and health professionals. Dr. Gillespie also leads workshops and develops continuing education programs for pharmacy, nursing, and other medical professionals.
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Emerging Infectious Diseases - N47384

33.95
About the Course

Nurses in every practice setting must be aware of the effects of emerging infectious diseases (EID). Case in point: the COVID-19 pandemic, which has influenced nearly every facet of life. As a result, nurses, at the center of the healthcare system, must understand the scientific as well as sociological aspects of infectious disease (ID). This course provides an overview of EID, offering useful historic and scientific underpinnings, as well as an introduction to the less obvious consequences of rapidly spreading infections. The course is aimed at empowering nurses to best serve their patients, despite the challenges projected by EID-associated disruptions. In broad strokes, this course provides general ID and EID information, discusses consequences of a pandemic, provides an overview of how governments and organizations prepare for EID, methods to combat the spread of ID, and descriptions of specific nursing approaches useful to prevent and manage EID.

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Provide two historic examples of a global pandemic.
  • Describe a potential consequence of antimicrobial resistance.
  • Explain how R0 can change over the course of an epidemic.
  • Detail a scenario that could permit an outbreak of a previously eradicated ID in the United States.
  • Identify one reason why some people refuse to vaccinate themselves and/or their children.
  • Understand the relationship between a pandemic and the human need to assign blame.
  • Name three components of hygiene efforts useful to counter the spread of ID.
  • Acknowledge the role of public health agencies in the management of contagious ID.
  • Identify two elements needed to support effective contact tracing efforts.
  • Explain two practices that nurses can teach their patients that are effective in reducing the spread of contagious diseases.

About the Author:
Bradley Gillespie, PharmD

Trained as a clinical pharmacist, Dr. Gillespie has practiced in an industrial setting for the past 25+ years. His initial role was as a Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceutics reviewer at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), followed by 20 years of leading early development programs in the pharma/biotech/nutritional industries. In addition to his industrial focus, he remains a registered pharmacist and enjoys mentoring drug development scientists and health professionals. Dr. Gillespie also leads workshops and develops continuing education programs for pharmacy, nursing, and other medical professionals.