Nursing: Infusion Therapy: Essentials for Safe Practice, 3rd Edition

64.95
Online
Elective
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About the Course

Infusion therapy is administered across all healthcare settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, outpatient settings, physician offices, and the home. For nurses working in hospitals, placement of a vascular access device (VAD) for infusion therapy is the most common invasive procedure. Because it is such common practice, nurses may consider infusion therapy routine and may underestimate the potential risks and complications that may be serious and even life threatening. This course provides an understanding related to selection of the most appropriate VAD for the patient, potential complications with an emphasis on identification of signs and symptoms, preventative interventions, and interventions to take in the event of occurrence, as well as safe infusion administration. The course is designed for both newer and experienced nurses. Newer or less-experienced nurses will learn the information needed to become knowledgeable and confident in providing infusion therapy-related care. For experienced nurses, the course provides a review of the basics and the opportunity to grow in understanding the professional implications of practicing infusion therapy.

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Analyze general issues related to vascular access device (VAD) selection and, specifically, the placement of peripheral, subcutaneous, and intraosseous access devices.
  • Analyze issues related to the selection and placement of central vascular access devices (CVADs).
  • Analyze general issues related to the care and management of peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs).
  • Analyze issues related to the care and management of central vascular access devices (CVADs).
  • Examine complications related to vascular access devices (VADs).
  • Describe best practices for infusion administration in acute and nonacute care settings, with consideration to special patient populations.
  • Analyze issues related to infusion administration in nonacute care settings.
  • Analyze nursing practice issues related to the practice of infusion therapy.
  • Analyze the Nursing Standards of Professional Performance as applied to the practice of infusion therapy nursing.

About the Author:
Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN

Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN, has worked as a clinical nurse specialist in home health since 1985. She has worked for Wheaton Franciscan Home Health and Hospice, now Ascension at Home, in Wisconsin for 35 years. As a clinical nurse specialist (CNS), she developed and continues to provide infusion-related education for home care nurses and direct patient care. She is the author of several books, including the Phillips Manual of IV Therapeutics, and more than 70 book chapters and journal articles on home care and infusion therapy topics. She is an Infusion Nurses Society (INS) past president, past chair for the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation, has served as the chair of the INS Standards of Practice Committee since 2011, and is an editorial board member for Home Healthcare Now. Over the past few years, she has presented the Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice across the United States, China, Europe, and several Middle Eastern, African, and Latin American countries. Ms. Gorski was inducted as a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing in 2006 and was awarded the CNS of the Year award in 2011 by the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists.
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Infusion Therapy: Essentials for Safe Practice, 3rd Edition - N35026

64.95
About the Course

Infusion therapy is administered across all healthcare settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, outpatient settings, physician offices, and the home. For nurses working in hospitals, placement of a vascular access device (VAD) for infusion therapy is the most common invasive procedure. Because it is such common practice, nurses may consider infusion therapy routine and may underestimate the potential risks and complications that may be serious and even life threatening. This course provides an understanding related to selection of the most appropriate VAD for the patient, potential complications with an emphasis on identification of signs and symptoms, preventative interventions, and interventions to take in the event of occurrence, as well as safe infusion administration. The course is designed for both newer and experienced nurses. Newer or less-experienced nurses will learn the information needed to become knowledgeable and confident in providing infusion therapy-related care. For experienced nurses, the course provides a review of the basics and the opportunity to grow in understanding the professional implications of practicing infusion therapy.

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Analyze general issues related to vascular access device (VAD) selection and, specifically, the placement of peripheral, subcutaneous, and intraosseous access devices.
  • Analyze issues related to the selection and placement of central vascular access devices (CVADs).
  • Analyze general issues related to the care and management of peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs).
  • Analyze issues related to the care and management of central vascular access devices (CVADs).
  • Examine complications related to vascular access devices (VADs).
  • Describe best practices for infusion administration in acute and nonacute care settings, with consideration to special patient populations.
  • Analyze issues related to infusion administration in nonacute care settings.
  • Analyze nursing practice issues related to the practice of infusion therapy.
  • Analyze the Nursing Standards of Professional Performance as applied to the practice of infusion therapy nursing.

About the Author:
Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN

Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN, has worked as a clinical nurse specialist in home health since 1985. She has worked for Wheaton Franciscan Home Health and Hospice, now Ascension at Home, in Wisconsin for 35 years. As a clinical nurse specialist (CNS), she developed and continues to provide infusion-related education for home care nurses and direct patient care. She is the author of several books, including the Phillips Manual of IV Therapeutics, and more than 70 book chapters and journal articles on home care and infusion therapy topics. She is an Infusion Nurses Society (INS) past president, past chair for the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation, has served as the chair of the INS Standards of Practice Committee since 2011, and is an editorial board member for Home Healthcare Now. Over the past few years, she has presented the Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice across the United States, China, Europe, and several Middle Eastern, African, and Latin American countries. Ms. Gorski was inducted as a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing in 2006 and was awarded the CNS of the Year award in 2011 by the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists.