Nursing: West Virginia Drug Diversion for Controlled Substances

11.95
Online
Mandatory
Please select your state to enroll in this course
About the Course

Many West Virginia nurses are likely to encounter patients requiring treatment with controlled substances across multiple practice settings. It is critical that they are well versed in the federal and state laws governing the prescribing of these products. In addition to understanding these statutory guidelines, nurses must be aware of the potential problem of diversion of controlled substances and of techniques to identify, report, and remedy these potentially dangerous situations. This course is an accredited continuing education course designed to satisfy specific West Virginia state controlled-substance diversion continuing education requirements.

Learning Outcomes:
After completing this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Describe one key component of a controlled-substance inventory.
  • Explain the importance of and two requirements of proper controlled-substance record keeping.
  • Distinguish between employee and employer legal liability for diversion of controlled substances.
  • Name one adverse outcome sometimes associated with the diversion of controlled substances.
  • Explain the potential danger of controlled substance diversion as it relates to the death of hospice patients.
  • Provide a working definition of a closed system as described by the Controlled Substances Act.
  • Characterize two behaviors sometimes associated with diverters of controlled substances.
  • State one critical step required after the identification of a case of diversion of controlled substances.

About the Author:
Bradley Gillespie, PharmD

Bradley Gillespie, PharmD, is trained as a clinical pharmacist. He has practiced in an industrial setting for the past 25+ years. His initial role was as a clinical pharmacology and biopharmaceutics reviewer at FDA, followed by 20 years of leading early development programs in the pharma/biotech/nutritional industries. In addition to his industrial focus, he remains a registered pharmacist and enjoys mentoring drug development scientists and health professionals and leading workshops and developing continuing education programs for pharmacy, nursing, and other medical professions.
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West Virginia Drug Diversion for Controlled Substances - N44139

11.95
About the Course

Many West Virginia nurses are likely to encounter patients requiring treatment with controlled substances across multiple practice settings. It is critical that they are well versed in the federal and state laws governing the prescribing of these products. In addition to understanding these statutory guidelines, nurses must be aware of the potential problem of diversion of controlled substances and of techniques to identify, report, and remedy these potentially dangerous situations. This course is an accredited continuing education course designed to satisfy specific West Virginia state controlled-substance diversion continuing education requirements.

Learning Outcomes:
After completing this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Describe one key component of a controlled-substance inventory.
  • Explain the importance of and two requirements of proper controlled-substance record keeping.
  • Distinguish between employee and employer legal liability for diversion of controlled substances.
  • Name one adverse outcome sometimes associated with the diversion of controlled substances.
  • Explain the potential danger of controlled substance diversion as it relates to the death of hospice patients.
  • Provide a working definition of a closed system as described by the Controlled Substances Act.
  • Characterize two behaviors sometimes associated with diverters of controlled substances.
  • State one critical step required after the identification of a case of diversion of controlled substances.

About the Author:
Bradley Gillespie, PharmD

Bradley Gillespie, PharmD, is trained as a clinical pharmacist. He has practiced in an industrial setting for the past 25+ years. His initial role was as a clinical pharmacology and biopharmaceutics reviewer at FDA, followed by 20 years of leading early development programs in the pharma/biotech/nutritional industries. In addition to his industrial focus, he remains a registered pharmacist and enjoys mentoring drug development scientists and health professionals and leading workshops and developing continuing education programs for pharmacy, nursing, and other medical professions.